Tips for Designing Luxury Packaging

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The Creative Director at Design Packaging Inc., Evelio Mattos, shared his tips for successful packaging design by stripping out the visual noise and creating timeless impressions through sensory primers. His post is full of great information and we love the #DPiPackTip’s, read it in it’s entirety here. We’re highlighting his top cues to consider:

1. Interactive – Guide consumers to self discover layered micro-interactions designed into the packaging or product. In addition to pop-ups, pull tabs, and unique closures think tactile substrates. If you follow P&P you know we are all about paper, some of our favorite go to’s for luxury packaging are those with a lush, suede like feel (Plike, Curious Cosmic, and Touché to name a few).

2. Audible – Higher pitched retail packaging can lower the perceived product value. Did you know thinner materials will provide a higher pitch than heavier weight materials? Some of our favorite choices for heavy weight shopping bags are text and cover papers in finishes like felt, vellum and eggshell (no coatings needed for protection).

3. Olfactive – Packaging designed with an unveiling process that considers powerful sensory cues, can transport users and create lasting olfactory impressions regardless of the environment their in. From traditional florals and food scents to non-traditional ones like suntan lotion and leather, scented ink offers a wide range of options.

4. Haptic – Nonverbal communication involving touch can impact a brand’s perception. Sharp folds and ease of use speak to quality and craftsmanship, both virtues of luxury. Redundant hand positions required to open packaging can reduce perceived product value.

5. Tactile – Tactile design features are able to create brand-defining cues. A classic tactile cue to luxury is pairing an all-over embossed uncoated paper with a sculpted metallic or high-gloss hot-stamp.

6. Closures – Much like fashion, packaging can be all about the accessories.  Luxury products require  a well designed layered unveiling process to build suspense up to the final reveal in the user’s personal environment.

7. Contrast Finishes – Classic visual cues to luxe, matte black with metallic gold, or crisp white with gloss black accents.  Our current favorite is copper foil on kraft paper, connoting luxury in an unexpected place.

8. Heritage – From custom papers, and fabrics, to stock materials with custom processes, luxury and prestige is a matter of restraint, not excess.

9. Anticipation – The idea of opening a box and revealing the final product immediately, leaves much to be desired. Poorly designed unveiling processes have been know to increase buyer’s remorse and product return rates.

10. Quality Control – Understanding how climate impacts materials and print processes at every stage of production through final user interaction is critical to understanding luxury packaging. This is why it’s so important to work with an experienced supplier, they’ll help guide you through the process.

Working on a luxury packaging project and need some help with paper selection or finding an experienced supplier in your area? Drop us a note at hello@parseandparcel.com.

 

Milton Glaser Designs Ads for Mad Men Final Season

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It took until the final season of Mad Men, for the show’s creator to enlist the work of iconic graphic designer Milton Glaser. The man who is synonymous with the advertising look of the late 60’s will have the ads he designed for the premier of the final season begin appearing next week on buses and billboards around the country.

Mr. Glaser was inspired by a member of the team’s manipulation of his own work – the 1966 Bob Dylan poster that someone cut the hair out of and then pasted it upside down. Check out the full story of the collaboration in this article by the NY Times.

Like many design fans we’ve been antsy for the new season to begin. This is the perfect fix.

Olympic Logo Retrospective

While the 2014 Winter Olympic games get underway in Sochi, we can’t help but notice the logo everywhere. Created by a team of Swiss designers at Interbrand Agency, the logo was described by the selection committee as “the first digital brand in the history of the Olympic movement.”
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As the New Yorker pointed out the current logo veers far from the original concepts which had a more refined feel to them featuring floral illustrations inspired by Russian art and natural elements. The official logo features no drawings (a rarity among Olympic logos) as well as all lowercase lettering, the five rings and a web address. Using a typeface similar to the Revue font, the Sochi logo has taken a beating for being too simplistic and difficult to read.

Not sure about that, but it’s clearly a departure from the original concepts as well as past Olympic logos.  Check out our pinterest board for a retrospective of Olympic logos past, in the meantime here’s a glimpse.

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Shades of Radiant Orchid

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It’s official. Radiant Orchid is Pantone’s Color of the Year for 2014. If you look at the color wheel, the hue is a sharp contrast to last year’s Emerald. According to Leatrice Eiseman, executive director for the Pantone Color Institute, this years selection is an “invitation to innovation. The purple family offers opportunity to do creative things.” Apparently that’s what we all want right now.

One group who’s sure to be looking to this color for inspiration in 2014 is brides. By the time the first crocus sprouts up in Spring, brides will be blushing for invitations in this shade. And why wouldn’t they? With a bevy of options to choose from, no need to limit the invitation elements to shades of white – from cover weight to announcement envelopes, there’s a hue of Radiant Orchid to make creatives swoon. Here’s a list of our paper pics in the PMS 18-3224 range:

Check out our Radiant Orchid Gallery on Pinterest.  To see more inspiration on the 2014 Color of the Year, join Parse & Parcel.