A Strong Relationship Between Designer and Printer

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There’s this idea that in order to produce high-quality print, one must have clients with deep pockets. I was a paper rep for many years and I can tell you some of the best print projects I worked on didn’t have huge budgets. In fact, it’s often just the opposite. Producing great print is not about having a great budget, it’s about having great relationships. You can tell a lot about the relationship between a designer and print rep by the quality of the project’s print production. When production details are so well executed they blend synergistically with the design, that’s the tell-tale sign of a strong relationship between designer and printer. And this was the case with the NewBridge 2017 Annual Report.

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Mohawk Goes Meta with Maker Quarterly Process Issue

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For most designers the process of creating is rarely a straight-forward line from concept and completion. Projects might be easier with a clear path to success, the reality is it rarely works that way. And that’s a good thing, life and work are about the journey, not the destination. The route between process and product is often a roundabout one, filled with equal parts joy and frustration. This issue of the Maker Quarterly is dedicated to that process. Designed by Hybrid Design, this issue celebrates the conscious path the makers take on the way to the destination. On top of that, Mohawk goes meta by bringing us inside the process of the making of the Process Issue.

MENÜ 2 – A Cookbook with a Nomadic Twist

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Last year we told you about MENU, a cookbook focusing on food but with a bit of a conceptual twist – mixing culinary talent and design to celebrate the idea of food as community in an experiential way. Well this limited edition collectible is back and this time the emphasis is on food with nomadic twist. MENÜ 2 is part storybook/recipes from Budapest centered people and part culinary wanderlust, as seen through the eyes of their Hungarian counterparts.